The Syrian War Crises – Living in Camps

It has been over 2 years of civil war in Syria and many of the Syrian Kurds stayed till their was very little food, electricity and basic need to continue living in their hometowns. Also with the rise of Islamist extremist they fled to Iraq, Kurdistan where they are waiting to return.

The Sky Outlives Everything Project is a project designed as an application to help educate children about conflict and why it happens and how it affects children their own age. Also looking at ways to create partnership with NGOs to help foster online relationships with children trapped by conflict and children in civilisation communicate with each other.

Photos are shot on 35mm on a Leica M6 and Medium Format on an old Rolleiflex.

  • For The Sky Outlives Everything Project
  • Type Multimedia

A man and his child look towards the dwindling sunset. Qushtappa camp, Kurdistan, Iraq

Women wait in line at a food distribution centre

A girl holds her father's hand while waiting in line at a distribution centre

A woman with child looks upon the food and shelter distribution line. Qushtappa

A boy looks out from his tent. Domiz camp

Many of the children within the camp have suffered mental problems from what they have endured. These problem can exist as speech impairment to mental efficiency. Domiz camp

Two friends pose for the camera. Many children have been brought together and created strong friendship due to the conflict. Kowergosk camp

A mother with her children stop to await a lift to go their home in Domiz which houses between 200,000 - 300,000 people

A child wait by a clothing collection of second hand clothes ready for the winter.

Kids climb up upon their wall to see what is happening

A Syrian opens a barber's shop within the camp. Domiz camp

A child protection centre to help let children be safe to gain an education. Run by ACTED. Domiz camp

A girl climb out of ditch to get to school created by UNICEF. Qushtappa camp

A woman and her son wash clothes. Qushtappa camp

Fatema and Muna pose by their home in Qushtappa camp. It is home to 2,000 families.

A blizzard of snow starts to fall as a child watches on. Domiz camp

A family sit drinking tea within their tent provided to them.

Children play on stones in the late afternoon. Kowergosk camp

Three child pose by their home as their mother and older sister watch on

A child and her mother

Children play on stones in the late afternoon. Kowergosk camp

Children play on stones in the late afternoon. Kowergosk camp

Fatema and Muna pose by their home in Qushtappa camp. It is home to 2,000 families.

Yasemin is twelve and wanted to take photos the instant she saw the camera. Qushtappa

Taksim was in Assad's military regime when his home in Aleppo was bombed by his own military. He left his post to find his daughter Hadea, wounded by shrapnel in her eye, her mother lay by her side having passed away.

With his daughter by his side, he fled to Erbil renting a small home to squat with others like him and work as a labourer though the work began to slowly end. His daughter needed to be by his side at all times. She began to be afraid without him. It felt shameful for him to beg for money and when I did, he bought food only for Hadea and sat by me to show his appreciation. Erbil, Kurdistan, Iraq.

Hamed took a love to the camera and wanted to take pictures with me. It was then I realised I no longer wanted to shoot the project alone and was happy to shoot on film while others could kids could photograph with my digital cameras.